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Global Warming

This page will hold great information for all of us eco wind powered kiters ... things we can do to help in the preservation of our little home called planet earth....'

 1) "We have at most ten years—not ten years to decide upon action, but ten years to alter fundamentally the trajectory of global greenhouse emissions.” Jim Hansen, NASA.  http://flickoff.org/       Sir Richard Branson along with Virgin records and Logowill announce a nationwide challenge to see which community or city in Canada can cut their emissions the most per capita. The contest, starting soon, will last over the summer. The winner will be treated to a massive FLICK-FEST—a carbon-neutral music festival featuring awesome acts and maybe even a few surprises.

Check out the challenge and have a party in your home town!  http://www.flickoff.org/contest

 2) You have the power to make a difference. Small changes to your daily routine can add up to big changes in helping to stop global warming.

http://www.stopglobalwarming.org/    Also check Al Gore's http://www.climatecrisis.net/takeaction/!!

3)logo  Another great site to learn how we can individualy make changes to help save the EARTH! http://www.davidsuzuki.org/NatureChallenge/

 

4) Here is some information about the melting that has occured in Antarctica in 2005

Better get out kite skiing before its all gone.  

Antarctica is twice as large as Australia. The ice sheet, which covers about 98 percent of the continent, has an average thickness of about 6,500 feet-more than a mile.

http://www.livescience.com/environment/060330_warming_antarctic.html

For now, the newly measured melting might seem like a small quantity. The loss of ice in Antarctica amounts to about 0.4 millimeters of global sea rise annually, with a margin of error of 0.2 millimeters, the study concludes. There are about 25 millimeters in an inch.

 

NASA's QuikScat satellite detected extensive areas of snow melt, shown in yellow and red,

in Antarctica in January 2005. Credit: NASA/JPL

 

This page last updated on 05/16/07 @ 12:55pm.